Best Spanish Language School in Guatemala

Why Guatemala and Where to Go

Choosing the best Spanish language school in Guatemala can be daunting. A new city, not many people you know to ask their opinion of the country or towns in Guatemala, you probably have never been there and to top it all, you are eager or in need to learn the best Spanish available as soon as possible.

I am glad you thought of Guatemala, simply because it is not in the radar for many sudents wanting to learn Spanish. Honestly they maybe missing out big time! Let me explain to you why…

Advantages of Attending a Spanish Language School in Guatemala

Lake Atitlan, Guatemala

Lake Atitlán, Guatemala

 

  • When it comes to studying Spanish abroad, price can really be a deciding factor. It’s important to get the best value for your money.Choosing a country with a low cost of living, such as Guatemala, can help you stretch your budget as far as possible, so that you can spend more time living abroad and practicing your Spanish with native speakers.
  •  Guatemalan Spanish is very good. The natives pronounce very well all the letters in a word and their speech is clear and easy to understand. Natives roll their “r”s smoothly without over exerting their sound. Also, Guatemalans don’t have heavy accents.
  •  Spanish language schools in Guatemala are in small towns overall which give you a family/home feeling you may not encounter in other countries like Mexico or Colombia.  Guatemala can be very rural and laid back therefore providing an excellent non intimidating environment for learning.

Top Spanish School in Antigua Guatemala

Some people may try to convince you that it is unsafe to learn Spanish in Guatemala. The truth is, just like in any country, parts of Guatemala are safer, more developed, and more foreigner-friendly than others.

If you take reasonable precautions and stick to the safe parts of the Guatemalan cities you visit, you will be perfectly fine.

When looking for a Spanish language school in Guatemala, you should definitely consider a school in Antigua. Antigua is widely regarded as one of the safest and cleanest cities in Guatemala.

Surrounded by three volcanic mountain peaks, this lovely city has beautiful scenery, charming colonial architecture, and some of the best dining in the country.

Antigua is only 45 minutes away from the hectic capital, Guatemala City, but it feels like another planet. You will certainly feel much safer in Antigua, where you can find helpful officers from the new “tourist police” on almost every corner.

If you decide to attend Spanish school in Antigua, you will find plenty of companies to choose from.

The language scene is really thriving in Antigua, which is good news for you! The rates for classes, family homestays, and apartments will all be quite competitive. When choosing a school, be sure to investigate what kind of curriculum it offers.

For most people, a curriculum focused on conversation is best. After all, it is much more natural and effective to learn Spanish by listening and speaking than by just reading from a book or doing grammar exercises.

You may also want to find out whether the school teaches “standard” Spanish, or the local Guatemalan variety, which employs “vos” instead of “tu.” It’s a small difference, but worth looking into.

Antigua, Guatemala

Antigua, Guatemala

Even the best Spanish language school in Guatemala needs to be supplemented with lots of practice!  Because the locals in Antigua are so friendly, you’ll have no trouble striking up some conversations. And because prices are so low, you’ll have plenty of chances to practice your Spanish while shopping, going out with classmates, or simply visiting tourist destinations!

When heading to Guatemala to study Spanish, don’t neglect to leave time to do a bit of traveling. Guatemala has some awesome tourist attractions, including many Mayan cultural sites.

I recommend you to experience Christmas in Guatemala. You can explore the Mayan’s architectural legacy at the ruins of Tikal National Park, or observe some of their descendants keeping traditions alive in the remote mountain village of Nebaj.

The famous crafts market of Chichicastenango and the relaxing shores of Lake Atitlán round out the must-visit spots in Guatemala.

Suplement with Spanish Learning Software
My Reviews of Tell Me More & Rocket Spanish

Wanting to complement your Spanish learning adventure by learning Spanish ahead or after coming back?

Check out my top 2 recommendations for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am Spanish tutor and teacher from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish in Latin America.

spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
Review

rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
Software Reviews

Spanish Immersion Programs

Choosing a School

Choosing amongst the myriad of Spanish immersion programs available today can be daunting. I know that because while tutoring, some of my students asked my opinion on how to go about choosing the best program to learn Spanish abroad.

I know people who attended Spanish immersion schools in Spain and Latin America, and I spoke to them to figure out what a Spanish learner must look for in an immersion program before choosing one.

The idea of going to a Spanish immersion school is to learn Spanish like a native does, by speaking and listening ONLY in Spanish for as many hours in the day as possible.

Choosing a Spanish Immersion Program
What to Look For

An Accredited School. Look for a school that has the accreditation of the Instituto Cervantes in Spain. This institute inspects its accredited and associated centers every two years.

The accreditation proves that the Spanish immersion schools are legally allowed to teach, have top qualified Spanish teachers, have an adequate number of students in each class, issue certificates, describe and represent the courses accurately so you know what you will be paying for, and take care of complaints appropriately.

This may allow students to earn an American college credit by studying in an institution that has this accreditation.

Types of Courses. Try to narrow your objective. Schools in Central American countries may not be as specialized as Spanish language schools in Spain (although Costa Rica and Mexico are the exception).

When choosing a specialized Spanish course like those from the don Quijote Spanish Courses you can be sure to have the best quality teachers. When choosing speacilized courses from other Spanish immersion schools, make sure you find out the level of education the teachers have.

Many times the teachers vary in their qualifications. Be sure they have college degrees and are trained in teaching the language.

Time and Daily Schedule. Ask for a specific description of the program you are interested in. What is included in the teachings (topics if possible), how many hours per day, how do the weekends work, if they have free conversational groups and how frequently they meet, and so forth.

Testimonials. As simple as it sounds go online and find out reviews and testimonials about the specific program and school. If they have a name and picture of the student even better, a real person gave the testimonial. If you can’t find any testimonials outside the school’s site go to the official website.

Location. It is important to have fun while learning Spanish. Make sure you research the location of the school and how close it is to amenities of your interest, transportation, eateries, movies, etc.

Does the school offer additional cultural classes like cooking, dancing, wine learning or others? These classes can make a meaningful difference because culture along with language are, in my opinion the best way to learn Spanish.

Accommodations. Many Spanish immersion programs offer accommodations. I like having many choices like the don Quijote Accommodation options.

Generally the best choice is to live with a Spanish speaking family where you can experience the real deal. Customs, foods, schedules and traditions are not the same, this maybe a challenge but it is well worth it!

Getting to know a family and how they live is a huge enrichment process. Also the accommodations through the school may be priced more favorably.

Getting a place on your own maybe more difficult and teaming up with friends may rob you of the cultural experience. Lets face it, living with a family forces you to speak.

Accommodations are with families, in apartments with other students from other parts of the world, residences or sometimes Spanish immersion programs steer you towards inexpensive accommodations in nearby hostels.

Some schools charge a minimum fee for booking your accomodations. That fee is well worth it when you think about the headaches you will be eliminating like language barriers, costs (schools generally get a discount) and handling bookings.

Time Frame. I always recommend a minimum of a month in a Spanish immersion program. Another consideration is the time of the year you want to go. It depends, if you are going to Central America remember the hurricane season in the Caribbean.

If going to South America think about the proximity of the country you choose to the Equator, the closer the warmer and with no seasons as we know it in the U.S.

If it is Summer in the northern hemisphere then it will be winter in the southern hemisphere in a country like Argentina.

Type of Spanish. Consider the differences between Spanish from Spain and Spanish from Latin America. Think about your target audience, the reasons for learning Spanish and where you are going to use it.

Spanish from Spain has more differences in pronunciation, usage of vosotros, and modisms when compared to Spanish from Latin American countries than Spanish from one Latin American country to another. So be mindful about the type of Spanish you want to learn.

Go With Institutions That Transfer Credits. There maybe very good schools that have excellent teachers but poor management and you will be stuck when trying to transfer your credits to an accredited university.

My recommendation? Follow these simple steps and you will be on your way:

  • Meet with your academic advisor about studying abroad at least 6 months in advance.
  • Ask the Spanish language school(s) to provide you with syllabus and course descriptions. Ask for the materials at least 4-6 months in advance.
  • Give the information of your academic advisor to the school in the foreign country to send the info. Some schools want the syllabus directly sent to the advisor, others are o.k. with you bringing it. Ask. By the speed and ease of the process you can start gauging the foreign school’s quality.
  • Next obtain a written approval from your university 2 to 3 months before traveling.
  • Follow the paying procedures from the Spanish language school, which generally ask you to pay one month in advance.
  • Complete the course work with excellent grades and attendance.
  • Make sure before you leave the country you are clear about needing transcripts. Pay the institution for submitting transcripts directly to you and the registrar’s office of your institution in your country of origin. This may take up to 3 months.

Spanish Immersion Programs with don Quijote

One program that hits all the marks I mentioned above with excellence is the Spanish immersion program don Quijote. It offers programs in Spain as well as the top Latin American countries in terms of pronunciation and richness of the language.

Do you know that many students who attended don Quijote have transfered credits to institutions like Adelphi University in NY, Northeastern University, Campbell University, Cornell University, Eastern Michigan University, and MIT Massachusetts institute of Tecnology amongst many?

That spells to me quality, reliability and confidence that they are experts at teaching Spanish to foreigners and managing Spanish immersion programs.

don Quijote has many excellent testimonials on its site that give you peace of mind.

They are in many countries and are accredited by the Instituto Cervantes.

With this level of professionalism you can’t go wrong by choosing don Quijote amongst all the Spanish immersion programs available!

Complement Learning Spanish Abroad with
The Best Spanish Learning Software

Wanting to complement your Spanish learning adventure by learning Spanish ahead or after coming back?

Check out my top 2 recommendations for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am Spanish tutor and teacher from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish in Latin America.

spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
Review

rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
Software Reviews

Spanish for Kids

Boost Their Brains While Preserving Hispanic Culture

Spanish for kids ads are popping everywhere these days. I guess after realizing how important Spanish is going to become in the U.S. many parents, organizations, and business owners realized this country is changing big time!

For many Hispanics like me, an immigrant from Colombia South-America, maintaining my native language and passing it down to my child was a no brainer because I think language is the single most important unifying element of Hispanic culture.

In one way or another learning to speak Spanish is becoming not simply a luxury but a necessity. Teaching Spanish for kids at a young age can:
1-Boost their domain of mental/cognitive flexibility.
2-Increase the density of their gray matter.
3-Prepare them better to live in a global economy.
4-Help you keep alive your Hispanic culture.

When I was pregnant with my son I started researching about the advantages, resources and tasks necessary to raise a bilingual child. I was pleasantly surprised to find plenty of studies explaining the differences in the brain of monolingual and bilingual children which made me realize the benefits of supporting bilingual upbringing.

Gone are the days when researchers like the psychologist Madorah E. Smith in 1939 concluded that “bilingualism caused retardation and that second-language learning in childhood is arduous, handicapping, and fraught with problems.”

Avan and Ian Both Bilingual in Spanish

Avan and Ian
Both Bilingual in Spanish

Smith’s conclusions were based in part on the fact that children who are being raised bilingual chose to mix vocabulary from two languages. I see this pattern frequently at home with my son, it is normal and healthy.

Now we know that “lexical mixing is a good indicator of language differentiation and shows the representation of two languages in the bilingual mind” as Ellen Bialystok explains in her 2001 book Bilingualism in Development: Language, Literacy, and Cognition.

After researching and following my gut feeling, I found the best way to pass my Hispanic culture to my family was through language.

When I started teaching my son Spanish I realized there were many expressions and words that I couldn’t translate in English to express the true meaning or emotion they carried. It was right there when I realized that language is not simply a vessel or a set of rules and codes to communicate. It is more than that, it is an expression of emotions, a way of living and that is closely related to culture.

If I wanted to hold on to my culture, I had to teach my son Spanish to immerse him into a lifestyle, emotions, traditions, and values that I wanted to preserve while being away from my native country.

Many of us who speak Spanish know that it is a rich language to express emotions and particular items of our culture. How can you translate in one word : “Sombrero vueltiao,” “tamal,” “pechiche,” “mariachi,” and the emotion these words evoke?… Impossible. That is why language is closely interwoven with culture.

I think raising bilingual Spanish kids opens your mind in the process. It also makes you aware if the rich culture attached to it. Thankfully, there has been an improvement in materials to help you introduce Spanish for kids and reinforce it at any age; the only requirement is that we, as parents, just have to be well informed.

A Parent or Teacher Learning Spanish?
My Reviews of Tell Me More & Rocket Spanish

Wanting to learn Spanish fast, hassle free and with top quality software while teaching or introducing Spanish to your children? Test Drive for FREE my recommendations to complement your Spanish learning adventure on the go or online

Check out my top 2 recommendations for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am Spanish tutor and teacher from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish in Latin America.

You can try them for FREE, full refund money back guarantee. You have lots to gain and nothing to lose!

spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
Review

rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
Software Reviews

Spanish Christmas Songs

When there’s a holiday and there’s merriment and enjoyment, you can be almost sure to find singing and dancing. In Hispanic culture no matter if you’re celebrating the feast of a certain saint or Christmas itself, there are songs we sing to commemorate the day and increase the happiness in the crowd.

Just as it is with Christmas songs in the United States or Christmas songs in the United Kingdom, there are also Christmas songs in Spain and Hispanic America, and we sing them in Spanish of course.

One of the reasons for this Christmas songs in my opinion, is the dominance of the Catholic Church in Spain and other Spanish speaking countries where Christmas is a major celebration.

The majority of Spanish Christmas songs are rooted in religious stories which talk about Catholic themes of the holiday. One of the best ways to make Christmas come alive in Spain and in Spanish speaking countries is with Spanish Christmas Songs.

"Children Singing Villancicos"

“Children Singing Villancicos”
by fotosdeloria

One of the most popular canciones de navidad or Christmas carol is Los Peces en El Rio. This song speaks about fishes in the river and their excitement over the birth of Jesus and how the Virgin Mary goes about the day with her chores.

The song starts by talking about the Virgin Mary combing her hair. Her hair is described to be that of gold and she uses a silver comb to fix her hair. The chorus of this Hispanic song then talks about the fishes and how they “drink” to see God born. It then continues on to the next stanza where the Virgin Mary washes diapers for baby Jesus and hangs them on rosemary. The birds sing just as the rosemary starts flowering.

The third stanza of this song then talks about the Virgin washing herself with soap and that her hands have been irritated. That’s how the song goes when it’s loosely translated into English.

But when you think about the English interpretation, it speaks mainly about the Virgin getting ready and preparing for a day with baby Jesus. She combs her precious hair and gives thanks for baby Jesus as she cannot understand why she was chosen as the mother of the son of God.

Spanish Christmas songs are very important in Hispanic Christmas because they tie the entire holiday. If you ask, many Hispanics would admit to having a typical CD of Villancicos de Navidad that we play throughout the season. Starting at the time when we make the Christmas tree.

Who has not heard of El Tuqui, Tuqui, El Tamborilero, Noche de Paz, Vamos Pastores Vamos, Zagalillos, etc? These are true Hispanic Christmas songs that reminds us of our Navidades growing up in family.

Popular Spanish Christmas Songs

Mi Burrito Sabanero
Campana Sobre Campana
Popurri de Navidad By Los Toribianitos
Los Doce Dias de Navidad. This page comes with a free PDF activity for the 12 Days of Christmas.

Other Christmas songs in Spanish are not only related to religion. Many talk about traditions during the holiday, like dancing, partying, drinking, ending the old year, etc. They may be classics that we all play to celebrate while cooking our Hispanics Christmas foods like arroz con pollo or roasted the pig.

One thing is for sure, once Christmas starts Hispanics have to have Spanish Christmas songs to play along. They are part of our celebrations and show how much we enjoy music overall.

If you would like to know more about Christmas songs in Spanish visit this wonderful site about Guatemala, where Benjamin shows you lyrics of some of the best Christmas carols in Spanish.

Learning Spanish? Try for FREE
The Best Spanish Learning Software

Wanting to learn Spanish fast, hassle free and with top quality software while complementing your Spanish learning adventure on the go or online?

Check out my top 2 recommendations and Reviews of Tell Me More & Rocket Spanish for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am a native Spanish speaker from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish you can find in South America!

Try them now for FREE with full refund and money back guarantee. You have lots to gain and nothing to lose!

spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
Review

rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
Software Reviews

Directory of Spanish Baby Girl Names

hispanic-baby-names-3

Brazilian Girl
by Mariana Choucair

hispanic-baby-names-5

Baby Girl
by Thom Quine



If you would like to know more about a particular Hispanic baby girl name simply scroll down and have fun.

Spanish baby girl names in the U.S. are still very attached to traditions, mainly in households where both parents are Hispanic.

María continues to be a very popular name even among Americans who lately pushed the name to a top spot in preference based on Social Security Administration data.

Many of the baby names in Spanish for girls came from the Bible, and specifically from several titles of the Virgin Mary like Rosario, Guadalupe, Socorro, etc.

Name Origin And Meaning Famous Hispanic
Abigail From the Hebrew Avigayil. Means: father rejoices. Fountain of happiness.
Ada Hebrew origin. Means: beauty.
Adalina Variation of Adeline which comes from the German Adala. Means: noble.
Adela From the German Adala. Means: noble.
Adelaida From the German Adalheidis. Means: noble sort.
Adelita Diminutive of Adela which comes from the German Adala. Means: noble. The name became synonymous of courage and strength in Mexico after the story of “Adelita,” one of the fearless women of the Mexican Revolution who traveled with the revolutionaries.
Adoración Latin origin. Means: adoration.
Adriana From the Latin name Hadrianus. Means: from Hadria. Also means magpie.
Agata Latin form of Greek Agathe. Means: good.
Aída From arabic origin. Verdi used this name for his opera “Aída.” Means: returning visitor.
Aidé From Greek origin. Means: the caressed one.
Alba Spanish and Italian name. Means: dawn, white morning light.
Alejandra From Greek Alexandros. Means: the protector and defender. Alejandra Guzmán. Mexican rock singer. 1968-.
Alicia From the French Adelais. Means: noble sort. Alicia Villareal. Mexican singer. 1974-.
Alina From the Arabic. Means: noble.
Almudena From Arabic origin. Means: the city.
Alondra Variation from Alejandra. From the Greek Alexandros. Means: the protector and defender.
Amada Feminine of Amado. Means: beloved.
Amalia From Arabic origin. Means: bee of the hive.
Amanda Feminine of Amado, a Spanish form of Latin Amatus. Means: beloved.
Amparo Spanish name meaning protection or shelter.
Ana Latin form of Hebrew Chana. Means: grace, favor. Ana Gabriel. Mexican singer and composer. 1955-
Angela One of the Spanish baby girl names from the Latin word Angelicus. Means: angelical.
Angélica One of the Spanish baby names from the Latin word Angelicus. Means: angelical.
Antonia One of the Spanish baby girl names of the Latin Roman Antonious. Means: invaluable.
Antonieta One of the Spanish baby girl names from the Latin Roman Antonius. Diminutive form of Antonia. Means: invaluable. María Antonieta de Las Nieves. Mexican actress. 1950-.
Anunciación From the Italian Annunziata. Means: announces.
Araceli Spanish name. Means: altar of the sky.
Ascención From the Latin ascendere. Means: ascension.
Astrid Modern Scandinavian form of Astridr. Means: God beautiful.
Asunción Another of the Spanish baby girl names taken from the Virgin Mary, in this case her assumption to heaven. Means: assumption.
Aura From Latin origin. Means: air.
Azucena Flower name from Arabic origin. Means: Lily.
Beatriz From the Latin Viatrix. Means: voyager through life.
Belén Name of the house of Bethlehem. Means: house of brad.
Belinda Possibly from the combination of the French belle and the Spanish linda. Means: beautiful.
Benedicta Feminine of Latin Benedictus. Meas: blessed.
Benigna From the Latin Benignus. Means: kind.
Bernarda Feminine form of Bernardo from the German Bernhardt. Means: bold as a bear.
Bibiana From the Roman Viviana. Means: alive.
Blanca From the English and French Blanche. Means: white.
Bonita Spanish origin. Means: pretty.
Camila Feminine of Camilo. From the Roman family name Camillus. Means: attendant –probably of a temple.
Candelaria Spanish name derived from the word candela. Means: candle.
Caridad Religious name from the Latin caritas. Means: charity, one of the three cardinal virtues.
Carla Feminine form of the German Carl. Means: man.
Carmelita Diminutive of the name Carmela, which is the feminine form of Carmel –a biblical name of a mountain of the holy land. Means: vineyard.
Carmen From the biblical name of a mountain of the holy land. Means: vineyard.
Carolina From the Latin Carolus. Means: man. Carolina Herrera. Venezuelan fashion designer, 1939-.
Catalina Associated with Greek cataros. Means: pure.
Caterina Associated with Greek cataros. Means: pure
Celestina Feminine of Spanish Celestino. Comes from the Latin Caelestinus. Means: heavenly.
Charo Form of the name Rosario. Another of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the virgin Mary, La Virgen Del Rosario –Virgin Of The Rosary. Means: rosary.
Chavela Variant of Isabel and the Hebrew name Elizabeth. Means: God’s promise.
Chela From the Indian Cheta or Cheda. Means: servant or pupil.
Chiquita Spanish name. Means: little one.
Clarisa From the Latin Claritia. Means: fame.
Claudia Feminine of Cladius. From Latin origin. Means: lame.
Concepción Spanish name. Means: conception.
Concha-Conchita Spanish name. Means: conception.
Constanza From the Latin name Constans. Means: stead fast.
Consuelo Spanish name. Means: consolation.
Corazón From Spanish origin. Means: heart.
Cristina Feminine of the Latin name Christianus. Means: follower of Christ. Cristina Saralegui. Cuban journalist, 1946-.
Cruz Spanish name. Means: cross.
Custodia From the Latin Custodis. Means: guardian, keeper.
Dalila From the Hebrew Delilah, which is the biblical name of the mistress of Sanson. Means: delicate, gentle.
Dama Spanish name. Means: lady, noble.
Débora The only female judge and prophet mentioned in the bible. Means: bee. Débora Arango. Colombian expressionist painter, 1907-2005.
Delfina Latin name probably coming from the city Delphi. Means: probably dolphin.
Diana From Latin origin. Diana was an ancient Roman divinity often depicted as a huntress. Means: divine.
Dina Hebrew name with Biblical origins. Name of the daughter of Jacob and Leah. Means: battle judged.
Dolores – Doloritas One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from a title of the Virgin Mary, La Virgen De Los Dolores -the virgin of sorrows. Means: sorrows. Dolores del Río. Mexican actress, 1905-1983.
Dominga Femenine form of the name Domingo derived from the Latin Dominicus. Means: belongs to the lord.
Domitila From the Latin name Domitilla. Roman Catholic families named their daughters Domitilla in honor to the saint Flavia Domitilla. Means: little tamed one.
Dorotea Feminine of the Latin Dorotheus. Means: gift of god.
Dulce One of the Spanish baby girl names meaning sweet.
Dulcinea Another of the Spanish baby girl names meaning sweet.
Eldelmira From the Anglo-Saxon name Aethelmaer. Composed of the English elements æðel = noble and mær = famous. Means: noble and famous.
Elena Variant of Helen. From Greek origins. Means: torch, shining light.
Elisa Nickname for Elisabeth. Means: god is my oath.
Eloisa From the Latin Elwisia. Means: very healthy and sound.
Elsa German, English and Scandinavian form of Elizabeth. Means: God is my oath.
Elva Means: truth.
Elvira Visigoth origin. Means: not certain. Probably a form of Aliwera meaning foreign truth.
Ema From German origin. Means: all-containing, universal.
Emelinda One of the Spanish baby girl names from the Latin Aemilius. Others are Emilia and Emiliana (see below.) Means: rival.
Emigdia From the Latin Emigdius. Means: half good.
Emilia Feminine of Emilio. One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the Latin Aemilious. Means rival.
Emiliana Feminine of Emiliano. One of the Spanish baby girl names from the Latin Aemilius. Means: rival.
Emperatriz Spanish baby girl name meaning empress.
Encarnación – Encarnada Spanish baby girl names meaning incarnation.
Esmeralda Spanish baby girl name. Means: Emerald.
Esperanza Spanish from of the Latin Sperantia. Means: hope.
Estebana One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the Greek Stephanos. Female form of Esteban. Means: crowned with Laurels.
Estefana Another of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the Greek Stephanos. Means: crowned with Laurels.
Estefanía Another of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the Greek Stephanos. Means: crowned with Laurels.
Estela From the Latin Stella. Means: Star.
Ester Hebrew name. Means: Star of Myrtle leaf.
Estrella Variation From the Latin Stella. Means: star
Eulalia From the Greek elements Eu = good and lalea = to talk. Means: well spoken.
Eva – Evita Latin form of Eve which comes from the Hebrew Chava. Means: alive, living.
Spanish name. Means: trust.
Felicidad From the Roman name Felicitas, which was a myth name of a goddess of good luck. Means: fortune, good luck. In Spanish it means happiness.
Fernanda Feminine name of Fernando, a name of Visigothic origin composed of the elements ferdi = journey and nand = prepared. Means: journey prepared.
Fidelia Femenine of the name Fidel which comes from the Latin Fidelis. Means: faithful.
Fermina Feminine of Fermín which comes from the Latin Firminus. Means: firm, steadfast.
Flor Spanish name. Means: flower.
Florencia – Florentina – Florida Feminine Spanish baby girl names derived form the Latin Florentius. Means: blossoming.
Fortunata Feminine of Fortunato which comes from the Latin Fortunatus. Means: fortunate.
Francisca Feminine form of Francisco which comes from the Latin Franciscus. Means: free.
Frescura Spanish name. Means: freshness.
Galena From the Roman Galenus. Means: calm, tranquil.
Generosa Spanish name. Means: generous.
Genoveva Probable from the Celtic name Geneviève. Means: white race.
Gertrudis From the German name Gertrude. Means: spear strength.
Gitana Spanish name. Means: gypsy.
Gracia From the Latin Gratia. Means: pleasing quality, good will and gratitude.
Graciana From the Latin Gratus. Means: agreeable.
Graciela From the English Grace that came from the Latin gratia. Means: pleasing quality, good Hill and gratitude.
Greta Nickname for the Danish/German name Margareta. Means: pearl.
Guadalupe One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the Virgen Mary, Virgen De Guadalupe, patron of Mexico.
Herminia Feminine of the Spanish Herminio which comes from the German Hermann. Means: army man.
Hermosa Spanish name. Means: beautiful.
Hortensia Spanish name of a Hydrangea plant.
Ignacia Femenine of Ignacio from the Latin Ignatius. Means: unknowing.
Inés From the name Agnes which comes from the Greek Hagne. Means: Chaste and pure.
Inmaculada One of the many Spanish baby girl names coming from the virgin Mary, La Virgen de la Immaculada Concepción –Virgin Of The Immaculate Conception. Means: Immaculate, pure, without stain.
Isabel – Isabela Variant of Elisabeth, the biblical name of the mother of John the Baptist. Means: God is my oath.
Isadora Variant of the English/French name Isidora that comes from the Greek Isidoros. Means: gift from Isis.
Ivet From From the German Yvo. Means: yew tree.
Jacinta Spanish form of the word Hyacinth which comes from the Greek Hyakinthos. Means: Hyacinth flower.
Javiera Feminine of Javier which comes from the Basque Xavier Means: a new house.
Jesusa Feminine of Jesús. Means: God is salvation.
Jimena Variant of Spanish Ximena which comes from the Greek Simon. Means: hearkening.
Joaquina Feminine of Joaquín which comes from the biblical name Joachim. Means: established by God.
Josefa – Josefina Spanish form of Joseph and Josephine which come from the Hebrew Yosef. Means: God shall add.
Juana – Juanita Feminine of Juan which comes from the Hebrew Yochanan. Means: god is gracious.
Judit Biblical name of wife of Esau. Means: woman of Judea.
Julia – Julieta Feminine of Julius a Roman Latin name. Means: soft bearded implying youth.
Juliana Roman name derived from Julius. Means: youth.
Juno Roman myth name of the spouse of Jupiter.
Justa – Justina Feminine of the Latin Justinus. Means: fair, just.
Laura From the Latin Laurus. Means: crowned with Laurels.
Leandra Feminine of Latin Leander. Means: lion man.
Leocadia From the Greek laukadus. Means: bright, clear.
Leonor – Leonora From the German name Alienor. Means: Foreign.
Lesly From Gaelic origin. Means: garden of Hollies.
Leticia From the Latin name Laetitia. Means: happiness.
Lía From the Hebrew Leah. Means: weary.
Liana Means: youthful.
Libia Derived from Libya. Romans used this Latin name to refer to the continent of Africa. Means: Africa.
Lida From the Biblical name Lydia who was a woman converted to Christianity by Paul. Means: of Lydia.
Ligia From Greek Ligea. Means: shrill whistling voice.
Lilian – Liliana From the Latin word Lilium. Means: Lily.
Lina From Arabic origin. Means: palm tree.
Linda Spanish name. Means: pretty.
Lisa Nickname for Elisabeth. Means: God is my oath.
Lola – Lolita Spanish form of Dolores, which is another of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the Virgen Mary. In this case Virgen De Los Dolores –Virgin of The Sorrows. Means: sorrows.
Lorena Feminine or of Lauren which is derived from the Roman Laurentius. Means: of Laurentum.
Lourdes Religious Spanish name that originated in the place in France where the Virgin Mary appeared to Bernarda. Means: not known.
Lucía Feminine form of Roman Lucios. Means: light.
Lucila Diminutive form of the Spanish name Lucía. Means: light.
Lucrecia From the Latin Lucror. Means: succed.
Luisa Spanish feminine of Luis which comes from the German name Hludwig. Means: famous warrior.
Luna From the Roman Myth name of a moon goddess. Means: moon.
Lupe – Lupita Diminutive Spanish name of Guadalupe, which is one of the Spanish baby girl names derived from title of the Virgin Mary, Virgen De Guadalupe -the patron of Mexico.
Luz Spanish religious name derived from a title of the virgin Mary, La Virgen De La Luz meaning virgin of the light. Means: light.
Mabel From the Latin Amabilis. Means: lovable.
Macarena – Macaria From the Latin name Makarius, also from a place in Seville. Means: blessed.
Mafalda From the Italian Matilda which originated in the German Mahthildis. Means: mighty in battle.
Magali From the French name Magalie. Means: probably a form of Margaret meaning pearl.
Magda From the Latin magdalena. Means: of Magdala.
Manola – Manolita – Manuela Feminine of the Spanish Manuel which is a biblical form of Emmanuel who was a promised Messiah. Means: God is with us.
Marcela Feminine of Marcelo which comes from the Roman Marcellus. Means: warlike.
Marcelina Form of Polish Marceli which comes from the Roman Marcellus. Means: warlike.
Margarita Latin form of Greek Margarites which comes from the word Margaron. Means: pearl.
María Latin form of Mary which is the biblical name of the mother of Jesus. Means: beloved.
Mariana Feminine form from the Roman Marianus. Means: like Marius.
Maribel Name coming from two names María and Isabel. Means: beloved – God is my oath.
Maricela From the Spanish names María and Celia. Means: beloved – heaven.
Maricruz From the Spanish names María and Cruz. Means: beloved – cross.
Mariel From the Latin María. Means: beloved.
Mariela Adapted from the Italian Mariella which comes from the Latin María. Means: beloved.
Marina Feminine form of the Latin Marinus. Means: of the sea.
Marisa Adapted from the English Marissa which comes from the Latin Maris. Means: of the sea.
Marisol Spanish name composed of the names María and Sol. Means: beloved sun.
Marita Spanish form of María. Means: beloved.
Marleni From the Latin Marlene. Means: beloved one from Magdala.
Marta Spanish form of Martha which comes from the Arameic biblical name of the sister of Lazarus. Means: lady.
Maya Spanish name from the Greek Maia, also in the Hidi myth it was the name of the mother of Siddhartha. Means: illusion.
Melinda Modern name made of Melanie and Linda. Means: dark serpent.
Melisa From the word Melissa. Means: honey bee.
Melva From the name Melvin probably from the Gaelic Maoilmhi. Means: gentle chieftain.
Mercedes One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the title of the Virgen Mary, in this case Virgen De Las Mercedes –Mary Of The Mercies. Means: mercies.
Mia From the Danish and Swedish form of María. Means: beloved.
Milagros Other of the Spanish baby girl names taken from the title of the Virgen Mary, Virgen De Los Milagros –Virgin Of the miracles. Means: miracles.
Milena From the Czec Milana. Means: favor, grace.
Miriam Hebrew form of Mary. Means: beloved.
Modesta Feminine form of Roman Modestus. Means: moderate, humble.
Mónica From the Latin Monere. Means: advise. counsel.
Narcisa From the feminine of Latin Narcissus. Means: sleep.
Natalia Latin name from the word Natalis. Means: birthday.
Natividad Spanish name for nativity.
Neli Nickname for Helen or Ellen. From the Greek origins. Means: torch, shining light.
Nicolasa Spanish feminine of Nicolás which originated in the Greek word Nikolaos. Means: victory of the people.
Nieve – Nieves Another of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora De Las Nieves –Our lady Of The Snow. Means: snow.
Noelia Spanish form of the French Noele. Means: God’s birthday.
Noemí Spanish form of Biblical Noami, who was the mother-in-law of Ruth. Means: pleasantness.
Nora From the Latin Honora. Means: honor, valor.
Norma From the Latin Norma. Means: standard, rule.
Nubia Probably from the Egyptian word nbw. Means: gold.
Octavia Feminine of Octavio from the Roman family name Octavus. Means: eighth.
Ofelia Spanish form of Ophelia from the Greek Ophelos. Means: help.
Olalla Spanish form of Eulalia. Means: well spoken.
Olga From the Russian Oleg which comes from the Scandinavian name Helge. Means: prosperous and successful.
Olivia Feminine form of Oliver, a name from Norman French origin. Means: elf army.
Paca – Paquita Spanish form of Francisca. Means: free.
Paloma Feminine Spanish name meaning dove or pigeon. Paloma Picasso. French-Spanish designer and daughter of painter Pablo Picasso. 1949-.
Pamela From the Greek elements Pam = all & Eli = honey. Means: all honey.
Pandora From the Greek myth of the woman who unleashed evil into the world by opening a box. From the elements Pan = all and Doron = gift. Means: all-gift.
Paola Feminine from the Italian Paolo which comes from the Latin Paulus. Means: small.
Pascuala Feminine of Pascual from the Latin Paschalis. Means: child of Ester.
Pastora Feminine of Pastor, a Spanish name of a 9-year-old shepherd who was martyred along with his brother in the 4th century. Means: shepherd.
Patricia Feminine of Latin Patricius. Means: noble woman.
Paula Feminine form of Latin Paulus. Means: small.
Paulina Feminine form of Latin Paulinus, a Roma Latin name originated in the word Paulus. Means: small Paulina Rubio. Mexican pop singer and actor. 1971-.
Penélope From the Greek myth of the wife of Odysseus. From the elements pene = niddle and lopas = spool. Means: weaver of cunning. Penelope Cruz. Spanish actress. 1974-.
Perla – Perlita Spanish form of pearl. Means: pearl.
Perpetua From the Latin Perpetuus. Means: everlasting.
Petra Latin feminine of Peter which comes from the Greek Petros. Means: stone, rock.
Petunia From the English name of the flower. Means: petunia.
Pía Feminine of Pío from the Latin Pius. Means: pious.
Piedad Spanish name meaning Mercy.
Pilar One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the title of the Virgin Mary, La virgin Del Pilar which means Mary Of The Pillar.
Plácida Feminine form of the Latin Placidus. Means: calm, placid.
Primavera Spanish name meaning Spring.
Prudencia From the Latin word prudens meaning prudent.
Pura – Purita Spanish name meaning pure.
Rafaela Feminine form of Raphael, a Biblical name of one of the seven archangels. Means: God has healed.
Ramira Feminine of Ramiro which comes from the Latin Ramirus. Means: wide and famous.
Ramona Spanish feminine of Ramón which comes from the German Raginmund. Means: wise protector.
Raquel One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the bible. Form of Rachel who was Jacob’s favorite wife. Means: lamb.
Rebeca one of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the biblical name of the wife of Isaac. Means: one who shares or traps.
Regina Spanish name meaning queen.
Reina Spanish name meaning queen.
Remedios One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the title of the Virgin Mary, La virgin De Los Remedios which means Virgin Of The Remedies.
Renata Spanish feminine of Renato which comes from the Latin Renatus. Means: reborn.
Roberta Feminine form of Roberto which comes from Robert. From German origin created from hrod = fame and berth = bright. Meaning: bright and famous.
Rocío One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the title of the virgin Mary, Virgen Del Rocío –Mary Of The Dew. Means: dew.
Rosa From Latin origin. Means: rose.
Rosalba Name of Italian origin from the words rosa = rose and alba = white.
Rosalinda Spanish name meaning pretty rose.
Rosangela Italian name compound of rose and angel.
Rosario One of the Spanish baby girl names derived from the title of the Virgin Mary –Nuestra Señora Del Rosario meaning Our Lady Of The Rosary. Means: rosary.
Rubi From the Latin rubber = red. Means: ruby.
Salma From Arabic Salman. Means: safe. Salma Hayek. Mexican actress, producer and director. 1966-.
Salomé Spanish name from Biblical origins. Salomé asked her father -Herod for the head of John the Baptist. Means: peace.
Salud Spanish name meaning health.
Samanta Derived from the English Samantha which is of unknown origin. Means: God has hearkened.
Sandra From the Italian Alessandra which is the feminine of Alexander which comes from the Greek Alexandros. Means: defender of mankind.
Sara From the Biblical name God gave to Sarai the wife of Abraham. Means: princess.
Selena Latin form of Greek Selene. Means: moon. Selena Quintanilla Perez. Mexican American singer. “The queen of Tejano music.” 1971-1995.
Silvana Feminine form of the Italian Silvano which comes from the Latin silva. Means: forest.
Silvia Roman name from the Latin Silvius. Means: from the forest.
Simona Feminine form of Simon which comes from the biblical name Simeon. Means: hearkening.
Socorro One of the Spanish baby girl names from the title of the Virgin Mary –María Del Pertpetuo Socorro meaning Mary Of The Perpetual Succor. Means: succor.
Sofía Spanish form of the Greek Sophia. Means: wisdon.
Soledad Spanish name meaning loneliness, solitude.
Sonia From the Russian name Sonya which comes from the Greek name Sophia. Means: wisdom.
Susana Spanish form of Sussana which is a biblical form of Greek Sousanna who was the wife of Joachim Means: lily.
Talía – Thalía Femenine form of Hebrew Tal. Means: dew. Thalia Ariadna Sodi Miranda. Mexican singer, 1971-.
Tatiana Feminine form of Latin Tatianus probably related to the word tata. Means: father.
Teófila Feminine of Teófilo from the Latin Theophilus. Means: God’s friend
Teresa From the Greek element therizo meaning harvest. Means: harvester.
Trinidad Spanish name meaning trinity.
Ursula From the Latin Ursula. Means: little she-bear.
Valencia Spanish name meaning power.
Valentina Feminine form of the Latin Valentinus which comes from the element valens that means healthy. Means: healthy, strong.
Valeria – Váleri Feminine form of Valerius which was a Roman name from the Latin Valere. Means: strong.
Vanesa Probably a variation form of the Greek Vanessa. Means: butterfly.
Verónica Latin form of Berenice. This name was influenced by the Latin phrase Veraiconia giving origin to the legend of St Verónica, who wiped Christ face on his way to the Calvary. Means: bringer of victory.
Victoria Roman name of the godess of victory. From of Roman Victorius. Means: victory.
Violeta Spanish name of the Violet flower, also the color violet.
Vivian From the Latin virgo. Means: virgin.
Viviana From the Roman Vivianus which is a name from the Latin vivus. Means: alive, animated.
Virginia From the Latin virgo. Means: virgin.
Ximena Feminine form of Spanish Ximen which comes from the Biblical Simeon, son of Jacob and Leah. Means: hearkening.
Xiomara Feminine form of Spanish Guiomar. Means: famous warrior.
Yazmín Variant of Jasmine which comes from the Persian Yasmine. Means: Jasmine flower.
Yesenia Possibly a Spanish form of the English Jessenia. Means: God sees.
Yolanda From the English Yolanda which first origins were the name Iolanthe. Means: violet flower.
Yvon French form of German Yvo. Means: yew tree.
Zarita Spanish baby girl name form of Sarah a biblical name. Means: princess.
Zenaida Spanish form of Greek Zenais. Means: possible mean Zeus.

Spanish Alphabet Song

El Alfabeto

There are many alphabet songs in Spanish. Some more traditional than others like the one Jose Luis Orozco, one the best-known bilingual children’s singer sings. The one you choose depends on what you want to introduce based on your audience.

Think of modern alphabet songs for older children who may be familiar with the tune or fast rythm of the songs.

When choosing a Spanish alphabet song to teach either your children/class think about:

  • How exposed are the children to Spanish, the more exposure the easier it is to learn the pronunciation from a faster song.
  • If you expose your children to Spanish regularly, try several alphabet songs and mix them during the day. Don’t teach just one song thinking you may confuse your children.
  • If your children are not exposed to Spanish on a regular basis, I recommend using the traditional ABC tune mixing it with the Spanish pronunciation. See the guide below.

Pronunciation Guide of Letters in English and Spanish

Pronunciation – El Alfabeto Español
a = [ah] (a)b = [bey] (be)c = [seh] (ce)ch = [cheh] (che)d = [deh] (de)e = [eh] (e)

f = [ehfeh] (efe)

g = [*] (ge)

h = [ahcheh] (ache)

i = [ee] (i)

j = [houtah] (jota)k = [kah] (ka)l = [ele] (ele)ll = [ehyeh] (elle)m = [eme] (eme)n = [ene] (ene)

ñ = [*] (en~e)

o = [au] (o)

p = [peh] (pe)

q = [ku] (cu)

r = [*] (ere)s = [esse] (ese)t = [teh] (te)u = [oo] (u)v = [veh] (ve)w = [veh doe-bleh]

(ve doble)

x = [eh kis]

y = [ee griegah] (i griega)

z = [zeh tah] (zeta)

Test Drive for FREE
the Best Spanish Learning Software
My Reviews of Tell Me More & Rocket Spanish

Wanting to learn Spanish fast, hassle free and with top quality software while complementing your Spanish learning adventure on the go or online?

Check out my top 2 recommendations for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am a native Spanish speaker from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish you can find in South America!

You can try them for FREE, full refund money back guarantee. You have lots to gain and nothing to lose!

spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
Review

rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
Software Reviews

Popurri de Navidad – Hispanic Christmas Song

Los Toribianitos Popurri de Navidad

La navidad Hispana is not complete without canciones de navidad. One of my favorite groups is Los Toribianitos. An amazing chorus of children from Peru that under the guidance of a Catholic priest hecame a symbol of Peruvian Christmas.

Los Toribianitos are acustomed to play for cardenals and arzbishops. It all started when 71 year old father Oscar Aquino, formed a choral of children that entered a school competition and won. Soon after, a well known TV program in Peru invited Los Toribianitos, and since then, they have captivated millions.

Popurri de Navidad is a mix of several Christmas songs with ritmo Latino that are famous in Hispanic culture. When my son heard this mix he started to dance right away!

Look for Hispanic Christmas Traditions in this Song

  • The first part of this popurri, talks about the hapiness of Nochebuena and the new year. So true amongst Latinos who seem to celebrate Christmas the entire month of December and continue doing so in January.
  • Did you hear when it mentions the soldier that comes back home and the feelings of a father and mother? Many of Hispanic countries have been plagued with dictatorships and civil wars, making this song representative of our political culture.
  • The third part talks about Mary and Joseph asking for lodging. We use these words throughout Hispanic America to reenact that particular moment. These words are part of the famous Mexican Posadas.
  • This Popurri de Navidad also talks about el pesebre that for us, Latinos, is very important during Christmas time.
  • My favorite part in the song is when it mentions the “old man” that at midnight will become ashes. Yes, this is one of my favorite traditions from Colombia. We make a human size doll that signifies the old year. We stuff it with fireworks and we burn it. children love it.

    Popurri de Navidad Lyrics

    Verse 1
    Un poco de amor
    un poco de paz
    se acercan la nochebuena
    el año nuevo y la navidad
    se acercan la nochebuena
    el año nuevo y la navidad.

    Un clarín que suena
    va tocando Diana
    regresa un soldado
    donde irá mañana

    un padre que sufre
    una madre llora
    un hijo regresa
    ríamos ahora.

    Repeat verse 1

    En el nombre del cielo
    os pido posada
    pues no puede estar
    mi esposa amada.

    Aquí no es mesón
    sigan adelante,
    pues no puedo abrir
    no vaya a ser un tunante.

    Entre santo un peregrino, un peregrino
    reciban este rincón
    contestó que la morada, la morada
    os la doy de corazón.

    Repeat verse

    Blancas azucenas, bellos girasoles
    naranjas y limas, limas y limones
    naranjas y limas, limas y limones
    más linda es la virgen que todas las flores.

    En un portalito, de cal y de arena
    nació Jesucristo, una nochebuena
    por la media noche, un gallo cantó

    y en su canto dijo, ya Cristo nació.

    Blancas azucenas, bellos girasoles
    naranjas y limas, limas y limones
    naranjas y limas, limas y limones
    más linda es la virgen que todas las flores.

    Feliz navidad, feliz navidad
    feliz navidad, prospero año y felicidad.

    Repeat previous verse

    Navidad, navidad, hoy es navidad
    es un día de alegría y felicidad, hey
    navidad, navidad, hoy es navidad
    es un día de alegría y felicidad.

    Repeat previous verse

    Una limosna para este pobre viejo
    una limosna para este pobre viejo
    que ha dejado todo, que ha dejado todo
    para el año nuevo.

    Hoy se ve el viejo muriéndose de risa
    hoy se ve el viejo muriéndose de risa
    por que a media noche, porque a media noche
    lo vuelven ceniza.

    Navidad, navidad, hoy es navidad
    es un día de alegría y felicidad, hey
    navidad, navidad, hoy es navidad
    es un día de alegría y felicidad.

    y felicidad, y felicidad, y felicidad, y felicidad. y felicidad,..

    Learning Spanish? Try for FREE
    The Best Spanish Learning Software

    Wanting to learn Spanish fast, hassle free and with top quality software while complementing your Spanish learning adventure on the go or online?

    Check out my top 2 recommendations and Reviews of Tell Me More & Rocket Spanish for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am a native Spanish speaker from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish you can find in South America!

    Try them now for FREE with full refund and money back guarantee. You have lots to gain and nothing to lose!

    spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

    Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
    Review

    rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
    Software Reviews

Pin Pón Es un Muñeco

Ian, my son still asks me to sing this canción infantil for him when I put him to bed.

One of the most important traditions we have at home is singing before bed time. I guess singing sooths our son, for me, it is a perfect time to keep Latin culture alive.

I guess Pin Pón became one of his favorite songs because I started altering the words to replace them with his name, and make Pin Pón Ian by singing: “Ian es un muñeco muy guapo y de cartón se lava la carita con agua y con jabón…” intead of “Pin Pón es un muñeco…”

Tips when teaching this song:

  • Teach the complete song before you start replacing the words with your child’s name.
  • Repetition is key.
  • Use this song when taking a bath or shower. It is the perfect time to sing and wash your face. Also bring a comb or peine to practice and act the entire song. Kids love acting!

Lyrics

Pin Pón es un muñeco
muy guapo y de cartón
se lava la carita con agua y con jabón. Repeat

Pin Pón siempre se peina con peine de marfil
y aunque se hace tirones no llora ni se hace así. Repeat

Pin Pón dame la mano
con un fuerte apretón
yo quiero ser tu amigo Pin Pón, Pin Pón, Pin Pón.

Pin Pón dame la mano
con un fuerte apreton
que quiero ser tu amigo Pin Pón, Pin Pón, Pin Pón.

This last verse is not included in the video
Y cuando las estrellas comienzan a salir
Pin Pón se va a la cama
Pin Pón se va a dormir.

Learning Spanish? Try for FREE
The Best Spanish Learning Software

Wanting to learn Spanish fast, hassle free and with top quality software while complementing your Spanish learning adventure on the go or online?

Check out my top 2 recommendations and Reviews of Tell Me More & Rocket Spanish for Spanish learning software. I tested them myself and remember, I am a native Spanish speaker from Colombia, which has one of the best Spanish you can find in South America!

Try them now for FREE with full refund and money back guarantee. You have lots to gain and nothing to lose!

spanish-learning-software-tell-me-more

Tell Me More Spanish VIDEO
Review

rocketspanishRocket Spanish & Tell Me More
Software Reviews